UAE – Abu Dhabi

 Abu Dhabi- UAE

 


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About  Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi is the largest and most populated of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates, with over 80% of its landmass. Across the UAE, Emirati citizens make up nearly 20% of the total population; the other 80% are expatriates from Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe and North America.

The UAE is four hours ahead of UTC (coordinated Universal Time – formerly known as GMT) and there is no daylight saving. Hence, when it is midday in Abu Dhabi, it is 3am in New York, 8am in London, 10 am in Johannesburg, 1.30pm in New Delhi, and 6pm in Sydney (not allowing for any summer time saving in those countries).

Abu Dhabi has a sub-tropical, arid climate. Sunny blue skies and high temperatures can be expected most of the year. Rainfall is sporadic, falling mainly in winter (November to March) and averaging 12 cms per year in most of the emirate.

The city is a fascinating and lively city with attractions aplenty ranging from the beauty of the eight kilometer perfectly manicured Corniche Road and beach, to the equally breathtaking Emirates Palace which located in the heart of the city is the preferred location for business travelers as well as providing a glamorous venue for international events, conferences and exhibitions.

 

Female Friendly Hotels in Abu Dhabi

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Great Eating Places

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Abu Dhabi Womens Networks and Events

 

Beauty and Fitness

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Customs and Safety

Abu Dhabi’s culture is firmly rooted in Arabia’s Islamic traditions.

Muslims are required to pray (facing Makkah) five times a day. The times vary according to the position of the sun, when the modern day call to prayer can be heard being transmitted through loudspeakers on mosque minarets.

UAE nationals usually wear traditional dress in public. For men, this is the kandura – a white full length shirt-like garment, which is worn with a white or red checkered headdress, known as a ghutra. This is secured with a black cord (agal).

In public, women wear a long, loose black robe (abaya) that covers their normal clothes – plus a headscarf (sheyla).

Women should face no problems while travelling in the UAE. The police are helpful and respectful. It is courteous to dress with a little modesty especially when shopping or sightseeing to avoid unwanted attention.

You will be able to drink alcohol in licensed bars and restaurants. There is zero tolerance on public drunkenness and drink driving

 

Travel and Transport

More carriers than ever are now flying from and to award-winning Abu Dhabi International Airport – one of the most customer-friendly airports around.

Travel around Abu Dhabi is fairly simple. The easiest form being taxis which are cheap and widely available. Be aware though that driver turnover seems to be an issue so often drivers will be unsure of locations. Always aim to give the nearest tourist location as the nearest point to your desired location. Taxi rides vary hugely in comfort and speed so please ensure you wear your seat belt and do not be afraid to ask the driver to slow down if you feel it is appropriate. Drivers must operate the meter, it is illegal for them to turn it off and negotiate a set price.

There are a very small number of ladies taxis running alongside regular taxis. These are pink in colour, driven by women and meant for females and children under 10.

There is also a very comprehensive bus service that runs throughout the city costing form 2aed to 10aed.

http://www.dot.abudhabi.ae/ckfinder/userfiles/files/AD Map 13-6-2013(3).pdf

 

Networking: See who is networking in Abu Dhabi now

Read the doing business in Abu Dhabi guide.

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